Thursday, February 25, 2016

What's new with Color Trends (2016)

2016 color trends | color of the year | pantone | http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/whats-new-with-color-trends-2016.html
It should come as no surprise to you that I absolutely love studying color trends. There are whole industries devoted to studying color trends because it helps retailers and manufacturers choose colors for their product lines that will most likely be successful for consumers.


Instead of gazing into a crystal ball and simply trying to predict what will be popular, these industry experts study what is already happening in the world and the market place. They study the colors in popular movies, museum exhibitions and fashions. Often, it is a cultural mood that will lend people to be drawn more to specific colors.

what's new with color trends in 2016
pantones 2016 color of the year rose quartz and serenity blue
For 2016, the experts at the Pantone Color Institute have actually chosen two colors, rose quartz and serenity. Their explanation that the trend is a blend of these colors and consumers are drawn to them because they create balance and clam which we are increasing seeking in our overly stimulating chaotic world.

Fun quick video on how the new colors make us feel



How colors influence art


None of us can avoid being influenced by our environment and I find these colors creeping their way into my artwork even before the announcements are made. At the end of 2015, I found myself creating a whole "word ornament" collection around these two colors. And these colors have crept into my new musical art collection as well.

vioin art http://www.miriamschulmanstudio.com/musical-art/monarch-maestro.html
Here, I have shown one of my latest painting, Monarch Maestro, against a backdrop of a serenity blue wall. In this room, you will also find pink accents that add brightness. The result is a room that soothes the soul like the string melodies of violin.
vioin art http://www.miriamschulmanstudio.com/musical-art/monarch-maestro.html
If you look carefully at this violin art, you will notice the soothing shades of rose and blue blending harmoniously. These colors keep the exuberant patterns of the mixed media art from overwhelming it. Color trends from prior years also linger, like the brown from 2015, and the radiant orchid of 2014. (you can read about those color trends in my blog posts:  What's new with color trends and 5 Ways Pantone Picks the Color of the Year)

saxophone painting http://www.miriamschulmanstudio.com/musical-art/sax-appeal.html
In this saxophone painting, I resisted the urge to add too much pink so the effect is calming but not overly feminine. This art would also look great against a blue wall, but art is always a quick cheat to add color to your room even if you keep the walls neutral.


Look for more pink and blue


Expect to notice these colors popping up next time you go shopping. I'm betting on lots of pink and blue prom dresses and bridesmaids this spring!

Other blog posts you might like


In Case We Haven't Met Yet...

Art Journaling Inspirations → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/01/my-favorite-art-journaling-magazine.htmlHello! I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives.
My art has been published by Somerset Studio, Art of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not working on art in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net


Now I want to hear from you. What do you think of these colors?

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Monday, February 22, 2016

Every Mistake is an Opportunity

Guest blog post by artist Carolyn Dube

Thank you Miriam for the invite to share with your readers what I learned about making mistakes..and I've made a lot of them!

When I started creating, I had a harsh and critical voice in my head.  A nuclear powered inner critic who made it so difficult to enjoy making art.  That voice kept the fun and play out of my day.  That was then.  Now, I've learned ways to quiet that cranky voice!  

Not surprisingly, I would get frustrated when things didn’t go exactly as I expected, as I planned, as I wished.  I would hear that quote, “Every mistake is an opportunity” and my frustration grew exponentially! I didn’t appreciate it one bit when someone said it to me in one of those moments.

But there was truth in it.  I was just too agitated to see it.  I had to find a way to end the frustration and to remember that there are opportunities in every mistake.  Saying the quote didn’t do it. But saying OOPS did!


 O.O.P.S. stands for Outstanding Opportunity Presenting Suddenly.  I just couldn’t take myself seriously when I said OOPS. The louder and more frustrated I was when I said it the sillier it sounded.  The angrier I was when I said it, the harder I laughed.  Try it. Say OOPS with anger.  It’s just ridiculous!

OOPS would jolt me out of a seriously defeating mood and bring me back to where I wanted to be.  Creating. Making. Playing and most of all enjoying the process.

This is just one of the ways I have helped myself let go and embrace the fun of making art.  I've got a free workshop called Permission to Play that takes you step-by-step through the process of creating a cardboard art journal as I share more ways to let yourself play.  

I no longer make mistakes; they are all Oopsies.  The frustration is gone and the joy of playing has taken its place.  In the video below, you’ll see how I built an art journal page with PanPastels as I make things formerly known as mistakes and build on them.  Plus, you’ll see how I seal PanPastels with a mini mister so that they don’t smear.



So next time you think you made a mistake try saying OOPS and see what happens and share it with me!  I'd love to see what you're making.


About Carolyn Dube


I’m Carolyn Dube and I’m an art adventurer. I didn’t start out as an art adventurer. I was ruled by my fears. I was stressed out. I was searching for something to help me come alive. I had a critical voice in my head that squashed my creativity. But that is all in the past! Why? Because I began to play, to have fun, and to embrace all of my “mistakes”. All those “failures” and “mistakes” that I had so harshly criticized myself about actually became true gifts as soon as I started saying O.O.P.S. Why O.O.P.S.? Because it stands for Outstanding Opportunities Presenting Suddenly.
 You can find me in the Facebook groupInstagram, and of course, on the blog at aColorfulJourney.com.
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Thursday, February 18, 2016

Best place to meet at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/best-place-to-meet-at-metropolitan.html @metmuseum

It is with a little trepidation that I share one of my favorite tricks for avoiding crowds at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Because if everyone finds out, well then, maybe it might get a little more crowded. But after struggling to find pictures and descriptions online to show you this favorite meeting spot, I quickly learned why this entrance has remained one of the best kept New York art lover's secrets. 


So, next time you are in New York City, you can take advantage of this trick and think of me.
http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/best-place-to-meet-at-metropolitan.html @metmuseum

It was impossible to find a front view of the facade of the Met that clearly showed the Uris entrance. What you want to do is avoid the main entrance hall which is about as crowded as Grand Central Terminal. The Met museum is probably the number one tourist attractions in New York City so it is crowded all day every day. The picture above must have been taken at eight in the morning because normally you will see hoards of people on the stairs eating their soft pretzels and hot dogs.


If you are arriving by taxi or on foot, start walking toward the left of the museum. There is a very unassuming entrance on 81st street. You may think it is for employees only, but it isn't.

If you are travelling by car, then you may already know about this entrance because you can access it from the parking garage on the inside of the museum. That is how I usually go these days. My museum membership gives me a discount on parking.

http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/best-place-to-meet-at-metropolitan.html @metmuseum
Here is a picture of the Uris Center entrance. I am not sure how current this pic is, but there is a very discreet awning and you just walk right on in. I think there must be a guard here that looks inside your purse... but there will be no line. That is why you might almost miss this entrance.
http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/best-place-to-meet-at-metropolitan.html @metmuseum
Just inside you will find a stone covered room ( not sure what this is.. polished limestone?) Anyway, there will be a non crowded "members desk on one side of the room and a regular ticket desk on the other. On this level, you will also find non-crowded bathrooms and a coat check line with no line. Really. Yes, everything you need is right here to start your adventure.

Gift Shop with Clearance Items


By the way, the best gift shop is ALSO on this level. It is smaller than the main one but this is where you will find their clearance items to get the best deals...and again, no lines.

Now, just in case you have never experienced the crowds at the Met, I thought I should share with you a picture of what the main entrance hall looks like. This is fairly typical. If you want to check your coat, there is a line rivaling the ones at Magic Mountain at Disney World. You will also have to wait in line to buy your tickets, etc etc... there is also no bathroom in the main lobby.

Follow my Art Adventures



So, that's it for now.. I am off to meet my friends at the Met today! Follow @schulmanArt on instagram or facebook to see what we see and I will be following up with another blog post of what we did later!



  

In Case We Haven't Met Yet...


Art Journaling Inspirations → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/01/my-favorite-art-journaling-magazine.htmlHello! I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives.

My art has been published by Somerset Studio, Art of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not working on art in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net


Now, I would love to hear from you! Have you ever been to the Metropolitan Museum of Art? Tell me about it!

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Friday, February 12, 2016

Flesh Food and Fundraising





will cotton and Alyssa Monks headline drawing fundraiser at teh New York Art Academy http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/flesh-food-and-fundraising.html
At the last moment, I was invited to a charity party at the New York Academy of Art. It was described to me by my good friend Marnie as "an expensive drawing class but lots of nude models and taught by the famous artist Will Cotton at the New York Academy of Art as a fundraiser."

Wanting very much to invest some of my earnings from the launch of my last online class ( Painting with Words) I was eager to support a good cause and hobnob with famous people.

I knew at the very least this would dress up my facebook page and make me look fabulous while at the same time I could dust off my life drawing skills.
Since my friend would already be in the city, I traveled from the suburbs on my own. When I reached the New York Art Academy, an art school founded by Andy Warhol, the young men at the front desk asked "you're here for the fundraiser?" and I am not sure if it was my paranoid imagination but it was said with a hint of surprise. Immediately my insecurity complex kicked in and I wondered if (yet again) I had guessed all wrong what to wear for this event. My friend had told me she would be wearing "black pants and a nice sweater" so I was wearing "nice pants and a black sweater."

What they were wearing


As it turned out, I was fine. Perhaps, somewhere in the middle of dress code ...maybe towards the bottom end of that. 

Here is a sampling of the outfits I spotted. One young chic thirty something socialite stood with her freshly cut bobbed hair and  yellow shift dress with an impossibly tiny black sling bag. There was another thirty something-ish woman decked out in eclectic patterned black fishnet stockings and black miniskirt topped by a Cookie Monster blue fur vest. Other outfit standouts were the woman with a purse made out of a license plate. I don't think the woman in the yellow shift dress actually touched any of the messy drawing supplies.. Most of the women there were in their fifties with tailored black pants topped by high end cashmere turtleneck sweaters in pastel shades, their necks draped with expensive looking jewelry.

The Set Up

Around the room there were three circles of easels with two nude models perched on a draped platforms. However,  no one seemed to be paying much attention to the beautiful naked bodies in the room except for Alyssa Monks and Will Cotton who were preparing their demonstration in one corner of the room.

Having found my friend and my courage (through a glass of red wine) we approached the two artists and introduced ourselves. Will's first comment to me was "Are you excited to draw tonight?" which was said in a tone that clearly made me understand that he assumed I had never drawn before. The truth was, most of the folks in the room had never drawn before so it was a fair assumption. Also, the full ticket price of $500 made it unlikely that any starving artist he never heard of would be coming in to "just draw" that night.

True Confession

Guilty.

I  actually had chosen the cheaper "junior" admission ticket price. There was nothing on the website declaring what a "junior" meant. I figured the worst that could happen was that I was carded at the door and asked to cough up a bigger donation.  A humiliation I was willing to risk. 
will cotton and Alyssa Monks headline drawing fundraiser at teh New York Art Academy http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/flesh-food-and-fundraising.html
Artist Will Cotton demonstrates "How to draw the figure"

will cotton and Alyssa Monks headline drawing fundraiser at teh New York Art Academy http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/flesh-food-and-fundraising.html
Alyssa Monks in front of her drawing
After the host and hostess murmered the required niceties we were divided into two groups. Half of the room watched Alyssa's demonstration while the other half of the room had the benefit of Will's demonstration. I was on Will's side of the room. 

No one complained which artist demo they were assigned. Although Will may be the more "famous" of the two (it is all subjective) Alyssa is way more glamorous... Sorry Will. You are very cute too. He doesn't look his age at all ..which is fifty. By the way, Alyssa, who is in her thirties, wore a mini skirt over black tights and Will wore cuffed jeans and converse.

How do you judge fame?



Speaking of fame-- how does one judge that? During my internet stalking spree I learned that Alyssa Monks has over 300 thousand facebook fans. While Will, who painted the famous nude Katy Perry album cover, and whose art has graced the covers of ArtNews and New York Magazine  has only a few thousand more than I do. (as of this writing, February 2016 Will Cotton has 8,384 fans and I have 5,154 (see SchulmanArt facebook page)

But his paintings sells for six figures. (Actually, I have no idea how much they sell for and I just made that up. While researching this blog, none of his paintings shown online have prices... so if you have to ask, you can't afford it) 

What does this prove? That when your prices are that high you just don't need as many collectors to support a viable art career... ie the higher your prices, the fewer customers you need.


What I learned during the demonstration



I hate to admit that I didn't fully take advantage of the great advice being given at the event during the drawing lesson. It is not that I am so arrogant to think I know everything. In fact, during the one moment that I was paying attention I learned how the neck sits really into the clavicles not on top of the shoulders... a detail  I either didn't fully understand before or had forgotten.

The Food


Anyway, like I said it was not that Will was boring but most of the guests continued to chat noisily among themselves and my ADD brain became distracted by each tempting passed hors d'oeuvres.
The food was both beautiful and artful. I was only annoyed that the servers kept interrupting my drawing sessions to ask if I wanted a canape. Next time, I will bring a sign like they have for international passengers on long flights. Perhaps, I should swipe a "do not disturb" door hanger during a future hotel visit to hang on my easel. 

(After writing this post, you will learn that I did swipe a few things throughout the night... but I digress.)

Wrestling Diet


Don't worry. I did get plenty of food during the cocktail hour when I mingled with the "famous" artists in the room. I was happy to diverge from the "wrestling" diet I have been following at home, In order to support my son who needs to "make weight", we have been eating nothing but steamed broccoli, grapefruit and fish. This, it turns out is an excellent diet for a woman my age. Just saying.
Each party guest was given an easel, a large drawing pad, charcoal and pastels as well as a gray kneaded eraser. In addition to the provided supplies, I also had schlepped in my watercolor markers to add finishing touches.
will cotton and Alyssa Monks headline drawing fundraiser at teh New York Art Academy http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/02/flesh-food-and-fundraising.html
Every twenty minutes the models take a break for five minutes and I used that time to chat with Will. My friend Marnie had just snagged the drawing created by the Dean of the Academy simply because she asked for it. So I turned to Will and asked if I could have his demo too. He said "No."

Thinking that maybe the host of the party had already laid claim to it, I told him I was surprised he didn't try to sell it to me. He said "You can't afford my art." and then he looked at me and said, "Well. I don't know, maybe you can." Remember this was a room filled with art patrons and society types and the only "real artists" there besides Marnie and myself were the faculty of the school and the famous people.


What art would you steal from the Museum of Modern Art?


Feeling slightly uncomfortable because I realized in his eyes he saw me neither as a peer nor as a potential collector, I changed the subject and asked him what kind of art he liked to collect. I was not going to pretend that I recognized any of the names he proffered as Marnie nodded knowingly in appreciation of his art tastes. And she was not pretending as she offered intelligent commentary on each artist.

Flustered,  I then asked what artwork he would most like to steal from the MoMa. Without hesitation he said a Picasso sculpture from the most recent exhibit but by then Marnie had noticed the models started posing again so I rushed back to my easel. 

Look over my shoulder as I draw the last pose of the night...
The drawing on the left is by Marnie Gelfman and all photos in this blog post are courtesy of photographer Marnie Gelfman
Here is a snapshot my friend Marnie took of my finished drawing. The pose for this lasted twenty minutes and it is not complete. I didn't post this to my facebook fan page because they have very strict "nipple" policies on facebook and instagram.

I focused mainly on the face and then I loved the way her jet black hair  cascaded over her breasts.  I wish I had more time to "ground" the figure since I prefer subjects to be integrated into the background rather than "floating." I think I may work on this later today after I complete a commission as my "reward." When I do, I will be listing this online with my other figure paintings.
With this drawing, I was completely pleased with myself and knew I had brought my "best self" to the easel that night.


"No, you can not have my drawing."


Now here is the punch line of the story. Just prior to drawing this, remember I was talking to Will Cotton who had refused to give me his little sketch. So when he came over with his eyes glinting. I gleefully detected a fleck of green in them. (You can compare my drawing with Will's 20 minute demo above.) While he and Alyssa Monks gaped in amazement, and serious art collectors, such as a board member of the Whitney, murmured their appreciation. Alyssa declared that I should do the demonstration at the party next year. She wasn't kidding.

I joking told Will that "No, you can not have my drawing." and that was that.
For my efforts, I was awarded one of their goofy prizes... "Painting most likely to hang in a Williamsburg Basement Apartment." I also won this apron.

In addition, instead of removing my drawings from the pad and rolling them up, I just took the whole damn drawing pad home as my "party favor." I am not sure if that was the right thing to do ... but I thought I would put the pad to the best use and each time I used it I would be reminded of this wonderful night. 



  

In Case We Haven't Met Yet...


Art Journaling Inspirations → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2016/01/my-favorite-art-journaling-magazine.htmlHello! I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives.

My art has been published by Somerset Studio, Art of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not working on art in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net


Now, I would love to hear from you! If you could steal any artwork you wanted, what would it be? ( no need to limit yourself to the Museum of Modern Art)

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