Thursday, August 27, 2015

Art Journal Inspiration: Pieces of Me

inspiration for your art journal → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/art-journal-inspiration-pieces-of-me.html

I like to think of my art journal as "pieces of me" that I glue and hold down together. Pieces of me can be words, thoughts, things I have seen that I like, color from from my fingertips or parts of other artworks.

Print Rejects



One piece of me that always delights me is to add a print of my artwork to the page. Since I sell prints on etsy, often I will have prints that for one reason or another were "screw ups." Often, this this is because I forgot to change the size settings before I printed it out so I have to make a new print for my collector. These off sized prints make lovely additions to my art journal. Take a look at a few I share here.
inspiration for your art journal → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/art-journal-inspiration-pieces-of-me.html

 

Yo!


I have a lot of "Yo Yo Ma." So he may make his appearance in another art journal spreads. In this one, I added him to the right page. On the left page, I used a doodled-on Tanglewood program. Then, I overlaid both the list on the left and Yo Yo on the right with cello "masks." I cut out the shape of a cello with a manila folder and traced it several times on both pages. I added the cello details in sharpies and painted a thin layer of white acrylic glaze around the cellos. {The page on the left is part of another art journal prompt you may like: Art Journal Ideas: Two for the road

You can collect a print of Yo Yo Ma HERE ( I promise to send you the correct size!)

inspiration for your art journal → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/art-journal-inspiration-pieces-of-me.html

This nude figure is from one of my most popular prints from my figure shop on etsy. I have two shops...one which is strictly G rated and also this other shop with classical figure paintings that may not be as family friendly to some. 

Be What you Need


This expression comes from my "Soul-cycle" spinning instructor, Melanie, who was always preaching to us to "Be what you need." What this means is not to expect others to give you what you need but to look inside yourself and create what you need in your life. For example, if you are looking for love then you can give love. If you are looking for a hug then you can give someone a hug instead of waiting for one to be offered to you. You can check out my figurative paintings HERE

inspiration for your art journal → http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/art-journal-inspiration-pieces-of-me.html
https://www.etsy.com/shop/SchulmanArts/search?search_query=flower+collage+painting+-skull+-inspiration&order=date_desc&view_type=gallery&ref=shop_searchThe flower in this art journal page came from another collage painting. I used just one flower. You can see the full collage painting in my etsy shop.  I saw this quote and it resonated with me so I decided it was a fitting quote for the flower journal page.

You can take a closer look at the flower painting in my etsy shop HERE
Three pages from my journal:

1) Be What you need
2) The Yo Yo Ma pages
3) Flowers 

(like this? why don't you pin it?)



More About Me



Hey, I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people (like you) how to craft your stories with art. I give you the techniques you need to get the results you desire which brings more joy to your life. 



My art has been published by Somerset StudioArt of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not playing with paint in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net I will be offering a mixed media class in the fall of 2015. join the wait list 
For super fans only: You can stay connected with me through one of my newsletters where I curate my content for either artists or art collectors, but if you want to receive everyone of my blog posts the day after I write them. you can subscribe to them via by Email 
I write about color trendsmuseum musingsmy artart journaling and watercolor techniques.


art journal ideas | art journal pages | get art journal inspiration → https://schulmanart.leadpages.net/freeartjournalclass/

claim your FREE art journal ebook! →download now

You can also download this FREE ART JOURNAL ebook for loads of prompts and techniques to keep you happy and busy!

 

Other stories you might like:


  

Have you ever used prints in your art journal? What do you think of this idea?

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Watercolor Wednesdays: How to Create Rock Textures

watercolor techniques | how to create rock textures http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/watercolor-wednesdays-how-to-create.html
In order to bring your watercolor landscape paintings to life, you need to add texture that will make your paintings look like there is much more detail than there really is. I have a whole toolkit full of tricks that I turn to whenever I want to add texture to my watercolor paintings.

One of the easier techniques to try out is to create rocks. You will find yourself using rocks in all sorts of landscape genre paintings....from the mossy rocks of a lagoon, to the salty rocks of the ocean. There are rocks on the riverbed and jutting out of a field. Rocks are so fun to make, there is no reason not to try out this easy technique.


watercolor techniques | how to create rock textures http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/watercolor-wednesdays-how-to-create.html
So, ready to learn the easy trick? 

1) First you need a piece of mat board or illustration board. If you have an old mat board lying around that is usually cheaper than illustration board anyway and I found it actually works slightly better. Cut it to about the size of a postcard. The exact size doesn't matter.

2) Paint a blob of your watercolor paint on one side of the mat board about the size of your "rock." You want to use the consistency of melted ice cream. The mixture should not be too watery or you will not be satisfied with your results. You want to mix together earth tones...and this time, don't worry about mixing mud! Mud makes for great looking rocks. Every painting needs a bit of "mud" in it 

3) Press your stamp firmly down. You may want to practice on a piece of scrap paper. In fact, I've noticed that my first stamp is usually the worst-- kind of like when you make pancakes. You may have to "break in" the stamp. 

4) The result is going to depend on the "gushiness" of your paint layer. If you don't use a lot of paint, then you will get a drier texture as shown above. You can leave it as is to make it look like snow on rocks or light on rocks or you can put a glaze on top but still maintain that pebbly texture. If you use a paint color that is more greenish then, the stamp will make it look like a mossy rock. If you use a lot of paint, then your stamp will leave "veins" which is also quite a nice texture effect which mimics the appearance of lichen.

How do you create rocks in your watercolor paintings? Would you give this technique a try?


watercolor techniques | watercolor painting techniques | how to paint with watercolors | discover your inner artist on http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/03/watercolor-dreams-do-come-true.html
Want to learn more techniques like these?
In Watercolor Textures, an online video 
ecourse, you will discover the confidence 
to create your own landscape painting
in your own style.
→ Learn more about this online class

other blog posts you might like:

https://schulmanart.leadpages.net/watercolorsupplylist/
Download your FREE ultimate watercolor supply list 
to get the exact list of paints, brushes and paper I use everyday to create my watercolors!

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Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Harness the Secret Powers of Animal Spirits

I always like to imagine that when birds cross my path-- and other animals as well-- that they are carrying secret messages to me from the spirit world. I know that I am not alone in this thinking as I often hear reports from otherwise sane and logical folks about "the eagle who flew over the funeral ceremony", or "the bird that landed on the sill just as their mother was passing." 

Have you heard a similar story or have one to share?


Hidden Meanings of Animal Spirits


Apparently, there is a whole study of the meanings of animal spirits and what it means if a particular animal crosses your path. Since I frequently include animals in my repertoire, I wanted to study thoughts on animal spirit meanings.


The Flamingo Animal Totem


If a flamingo has wandered across your path, he is reminding you to get in touch with your emotions. From Linsdomain.com I learned: "Flamingo signals a time of cleansing and filtering to find out what nourishes and heals the heart. Flamingo shows you how to follow your heart in all of your endeavors."
There is a lot to notice about this original flamingo painting and you will appreciate something new each time you study it. Here are some hints on what you should look for... There is piano music sprinkled throughout the composition playing its happy songs and romantic writing scrawled along the top. The bright teal forms a textual whimsical border. This flamingo may be pink but he is fierce and strong and wants you to be as well. Each day he will stare at you from wherever you decide to display him giving you strength and commitment to your goals helping you reaffirm your life's purpose.

The dominant colors are bright warm pink and a calming teal blue....do the colors have that same affect on you?


→Collect Flamingo Art HERE 

https://schulmanart.leadpages.net/mixed-media-madness-survey/

Attention Artists and Art Students!

Are you interested in learning how to create this type of art?
I am designing an online class just for you!
take the online quiz to design the class of your dreams.


Look for the word "courage" in the water near the flamingo's beak. The word "play" is more obvious just above the waterline. The word "fun" in white is just visible below my signature.

After researching the meanings of different animal totems and their spirits, I arrived at this significance of flamingos:

Here is what I learned from www.spirit-animals.com: "Flamingos may be letting you know that it is time for you to get out and socialize and have some fun in your life. This will be helpful in letting go of stressful situations and coming to terms with changes in your life. Know that new ideas and options will be revealed to you by immersing yourself in the company of others and allowing yourself to balance in gratitude for what you have. Appreciate those around you."

Invite this animal spirit to watch over your room and remind you to get out and have the courage to play and have fun!


→Collect Flamingo Art HERE

and then you will always have a reminder of this animal spirit



 http://tinyurl.com/schulmanarts
Want to save on this art right now?
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other stories you might like



More About Me



Hey, I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people (like you) how to craft your stories with art. I give you the techniques you need to get the results you desire which brings more joy to your life. 

My art has been published by Somerset StudioArt of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not playing with paint in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net I will be offering a mixed media class in the fall of 2015. join the wait list 
For super fans only: You can stay connected with me through one of my newsletters where I curate my content for either artists or art collectors, but if you want to receive everyone of my blog posts the day after I write them. you can subscribe to them via by Email I write about color trendsmuseum musingsmy artart journaling and watercolor techniques.

What does the flamingo mean to you?

Read More »

Monday, August 24, 2015

Under the Influence: John Singer Sargent


learn about the portraits of John Singer Sargent http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/under-influence-john-singer-sargent.html @metmuseum #metsargent @schulmanaArt
The two artists that have had the greatest influence over my portraits are John Singer Sargent and Mary Cassatt. Today, I am going to turn the spot light on Sargent as I have just revisited some of these influential portraits at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. You can see them as well until October 8, 2015. 

In this portrait above, Portrait of a Boy, Sargent paints the child of one of his friends. You can learn a little bit more about that portrait in Hands: The Second Portrait.

Here, Sargent does nothing to disguise the boy's bored expression. He gets right to the heart and soul of the boy's personality. This is the effect I am going for as well when I paint children.

For example, in this portrait do you see the same dreamy bored expression on the boy to the far left? It was really hard to keep this easily distracted child from giggling and laughing; however, I managed to capture him at a more introspective moment. This was not easy and I actually had to combine two photographs to get all three kids at the moment that best expressed each.

I was lucky to have a warm sunny day to photograph the kids in sunlight and then capture that in watercolor. I am grateful that I had the opportunity to paint this commission.

portrait paintings of John Singer Sargent and @schulmanart #MetSargent @metmusuem http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/under-influence-john-singer-sargent.html
In these two paintings, you can see a more direct correlation between Sargent's influence and my painting. After viewing "The Birthday Party" at a 2004 Brooklyn Museum exhibition, "Great Expectations", I went home and immediately began working on this painting of my daughter lit by the similar candlelight. The two toddlers (mine and Sargent's subject) are apparently overwhelmed by the adult prepared parties. You can see "The Birthday Party" at the Met's 2015 Sargent exhibition as well.

portrait paintings of John Singer Sargent and @schulmanart #MetSargent @metmusuem http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/under-influence-john-singer-sargent.html
Another painting that appears in both exhibitions and exerted a strong influence on my art is "Carnation Lily Lily Rose" (above bottom left) as well another painting, Garden Study of the Vickers Children.

In these paintings by Sargent, I admired the placing of children in a garden. Although they are surrounded by flowers, they out shine the flowers around them. I like to link the idea of children to flowers as I believe children are like flowers in the garden with each blooming on their own schedule. My paintings are the three watercolors on top, top right and bottom right. Sargent's painting is at the bottom left.

You can view my commissioned portraits on my website. If you are in the New York metropolitan area, I do portraits on commission. If you are an aspiring artist you may be interested in my online class on portrait painting in watercolor. 


Other stories you might like




Hey, I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives.

My art has been published by Somerset Studio, Art of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not playing with paint in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. 


Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com where you can view my commissioned portraits or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net. You may be especially interested in my online class on portrait painting in watercolor.

For super fans only: You can stay connected to me through one of my newsletters where I curate my content for either artists or art collectors, but if you want to receive all of my blog posts the day after I write them, you can subscribe via by Email 
Read More »

Friday, August 21, 2015

Hands: The Second Portrait




hands in the portraits of John Singer Sargent #metsargent @metmuseum read more on http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/hands-second-portrait.html
Hands are often called the second portrait and for good reason. It is not a surprise that an artist that values her hands above all body parts (except maybe our eyes) would notice others' hands. The hands are a source of self-expression. We often refer to people who talk "with their hands." Read on to learn why hands are the "second portrait."

In the portraits of John Singer Sargent, he demonstrates his masterly skill of depicting the sitter's personality through their hands. Take a look at the 12 examples in this article and see if you agree. All these portraits are included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition "Sargent Portraits of Artists and Friends" which brings together ninety-two of the artist's paintings and drawings of members of his impressive artistic circle. The show is open through October 4th, 2015.

Above: The Hands of Dr. Pozzi 


In the portrait above, a man poses in a red house robe. We come to learn that this is the portrait of Dr. Pozzi, a famed nineteenth century gynecologist. You have to appreciate the artist's sense of humor showing such a doctor posed nearly, but not quite, naked in his bathrobe. Like the patients he serves, he casually holds the sides of his robe together with his long elegant surgeon hands. Another hand is draped playfully over the belt loops as if the robe were about to open. It is a very sexy and improper portrait of a doctor who tends to a woman's intimate medical needs.


#MetSargent portrait painting techniques for hands: http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/hands-second-portrait.html

Isabella Stewart Gardner
1. detail of  Isabella Stewart Gardner. This important American collector played a big part in the career of Sargent. Notice the way her arms are posed as a ballerina with her white patrician hands clasped at the bottom to mirror the pearl necklace she wears at her neck and waistline. The portrait was meant to mimic the daring style of Madame X

2. detail of Asher Wertheimer, leading art dealer in London. The hand perfectly characterizes the cigar chomping high flying Jewish business man. 

3. detail from portrait of Jacques-Emile Blanche. Sargent gave careful attention to Blanche’s attenuated fingers. Sargent bartered this portrait in exchange for some Louis XV style furniture from the sitter, a well known Parisian artist.

4. detail of Charles-Émile-Auguste Durand, the highly influential portrait teacher who taught Sargent. This portrait plays homage to his teacher's style and one can't help but notice the ruffled cuffs, the walking cane as signals of artistic eccentricity.

5. detail from portrait of Italian artist Antonio Mancini. This is yet another artist friend of Sargent. One thing to take note in this exhibition is the sheer number of artists that Sargent befriended. In fact, you will note throughout history our best beloved artists all surrounded themselves with other artists. This brings to mind the quote that you become the average of the five people you spend the most time with. In other words, if you want to be a successful artist, surround yourself with other successful artists. Although this sketch was produced in just an hour, Sargent felt it important to include one of his sitter's hands.


Portrait of a Boy
6. detail from Portrait of a Boy This portrait was another trade the artist did with yet another artist friend. The relaxed hands mimic the bored expression of the child

7. detail from La Carmencita Dancing. Notice how he accentuates the famed dancer's hands. In this full length portrait, the feet are hidden from view. This dancer caused quite a stir in her time, not unlike Elvis in the 1950's, as her dancing was considered risque.



Mary Louisa Cushing Boit
8. detail of Mary Louisa Cushing Boit. Her husband was a well known watercolor painter but you might be better familiar with the famous portrait of her daughters that hangs in the Museum of Fine Arts "The Children of Edward Darley Boit." 

This portrait was considered vulgar because of the polka dot dress-- yes, scandalous, I know. Notice the sitter's double chin and teeth baring smile in the full view at right...oh, my. But you can see all this expression in her hands which aren't even properly folded but fingers are a tangle of bohemian lust for life.

9. detail of  American actor Joseph Jefferson portraying a character


http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/learning-from-masters-psychological.html

10. detail from portrait of the Pailleron children.. you can read more about the effeminate hands of the brother in this double portrait in the blog post: Learning from the Masters: The Psychological Portraits of John Singer Sargent

11. detail of Madame Ramón Subercaseaux


Other stories you might like




Hey, I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives.

My art has been published by Somerset Studio, Art of Man and The New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not playing with paint in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. 


Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com where you can view my commissioned portraits or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net. You may be especially interested in my online class on portrait painting in watercolor.

For super fans only: You can stay connected to me through one of my newsletters where I curate my content for either artists or art collectors, but if you want to receive all of my blog posts the day after I write them, you can subscribe via by Email 
Read More »

Monday, August 3, 2015

Learning from the Masters: The Psychological Portraits of John Singer Sargent

portraits of john singer sargent #MetSargent @metmuseum http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/learning-from-masters-psychological.html
As I was preparing this blog post, my husband leaned over my shoulder and asked "What do you mean by psychological portraits?" Well, I pointed out..."look at that girl's face and the tension in her fingers and toes, she looks like she just finished a tantrum. Contrast that to her brother, whose wrist is bent and limply perched on the rug. He peers at you with a know it all stare and disdain..you are not sure if the disdain is meant for you or his sister." 


Then I added, "Look at the way he painted the parents! The father's shirt isn't even tucked in... he could have easily have told his patron to tuck in the shirt but he painted him that way anyway. And look at his sourpuss wife," I continued, "he even left in the frown lines around the corners of her mouth and the tightly pursed lips."

"Great" my husband replied, "Now I won't have to read the blog post."

The hidden truth behind every successful portrait


The exhibition, "Sargent, Portraits of Artists and Friends" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art ( you can see it through October 4, 2015) truly knocked my socks off. Having painted dozens of portraits through the years, the choices made by this painter always speaks to me. What made this exhibition unique, however, is that many of the paintings included were not commissioned portraits which allowed the artist to freely express his vision without worrying about the wrath of the paying patron. Moreover, every successful portrait will include psychological clues to its sitter.

This was a large exhibit and I have a lot to say about it and I will not even attempt to do it all justice in one blog post, so this will be the first of a series of blog posts covering my interpretations of the art and how his art has influenced my art as many of these paintings I had seen before in other shows and in different contexts.

portraits of john singer sargent #MetSargent @metmuseum http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/08/learning-from-masters-psychological.html

Portraits of John Singer Sargent:

1) Pailleron Children, 1880. This was not my first encounter with this mesmerizing portrait depicting these two. I first encountered them at the Brooklyn Museum in 2005. 

According to the Brooklyn Museum curators: Although children may not immediately come to mind when thinking about Sargent, they appear frequently in several types of paintings he did throughout his career—in commissioned and non-commissioned portraits and in genre (thematic) subjects. A survey of a selection of these works presents the idea that Sargent deliberately exhibited paintings of children at crucial points in his career to shape critical and public opinion of his art; that his art yielded the uncalculated result of elevating the theme of childhood above that of sentimentality; and that his alteration of the traditional iconography of childhood coincided with new attitudes about children that were forming in Europe and North America.

Tantrums


At both exhibits you learn that the artist had to endure over 80 sittings, and frequent tantrums from the girl about her outfit. Her eyes still brimming with tears as she tests her will against those of the adults around her and she perches ready to flee. The brother is positioned on the other side of the rug draped bench, seemingly not bothered by the societal constraints placed upon him. You notice his "knowing attitude", his slouch (contrasts to the erect tense posture of his sister), and most tellingly, his limp wrists.

Family Resemblance


2) Marie Pailleron 1879 & 3) Edourd Pailleron 1879
I was delighted that I could for the first time view the children next to their parents. Can you see the resemblance? You have a family of milk toast men and strong willed females. The girl strongly resembles her high maintenance mother and the boy, his disheveled and low key father. Do you notice the similar postures of the father and son? The mean stare of the mother with her formerly and stiffly folded hands? Also notice the contrast between the open collar of the father and the tightly collared wife. 


Every detail is intentional


Since we know the artist frequently collaborated with his sitters on the choice of their fashion, we know that nothing is an accident..this artist "sees" and "tells" us all we need to know about this family.


Other stories you might like




Hey, I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives.

My art has been published by Somerset Studio, Art of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not playing with paint in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com where you can view my commissioned portraits or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net. You may be especially interested in my online class on portrait painting in watercolor.


For super fans only: You can stay connected to me through one of my newsletters where I curate my content for either artists or art collectors, but if you want to receive all of my blog posts the day after I write them, you can subscribe via by Email 
Read More »

Thursday, July 30, 2015

What do you put on the first page of your art journal?

art journal ideas http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/07/what-do-you-put-on-first-page-of-your.html
A commonly asked question is "what do you put on the first page of your art journal?" I actually take the stress off of myself by always starting the first page the same way. 

art journal pages  http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/07/what-do-you-put-on-first-page-of-your.html
The first page of every art journal says "art Journal by Miriam Schulman." Kind of goofy, right? But why stress yourself out over a process that is supposed to relax you?

art journal inspiration  http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/07/what-do-you-put-on-first-page-of-your.html
This is my second completely finished journal. In my first finished journal, I printed my name and address on a label for the inside cover since I was submitting it to a magazine and that is part of their submission process. This time, I decided to use that requirement as a prompt for lettering. I put a patchwork of scrapbook papers down first, added my lettering and then filled in around the negative spaces with Faber-Castell India ink pens in different colors. 


For some reason,. although you could probably google my address and phone number I felt a bit queasy splashing those stats across a blog post. So, I censored this page a bit.

art journal inspiration   http://schulmanart.blogspot.com/2015/07/what-do-you-put-on-first-page-of-your.html
Here you can see how I coordinated the colors in the "address" page with the first page. Creating the address page as a mixed media detail gave me a sense of completion and closure with my journal.

Do you want more ideas for your art journal?

Here are some other blog posts you might like:

More About Me



Hey, I'm Miriam Schulman and I create mixed media art to tell stories. I also teach other people how to craft their stories with art. I give them the techniques they need to get the results they desire which brings more joy to their lives. 

My art has been published by Somerset StudioArt of Man and the New York Times among others and collected by an international audience. When I'm not playing with paint in my studio, you'll find me in a museum spending time with friends or family. Explore my art at SchulmanArt.com or join the fun at TheInspirationPlace.net I will be offering a mixed media class in the fall of 2015. join the wait list 

For super fans only: You can stay connected with me through one of my newsletters where I curate my content for either artists or art collectors, but if you want to receive everyone of my blog posts the day after I write them. you can subscribe to them via by Email I write about color trendsmuseum musingsmy artart journaling and watercolor techniques.


You can also download this FREE ART JOURNAL ebook for loads of prompts and techniques to keep you happy and busy!

art journal ideas | art journal pages | get art journal inspiration → https://schulmanart.leadpages.net/freeartjournalclass/

claim your FREE art journal ebook! →download now

 

 


What is on the first page of your art journal?

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